NovelTM at MLA 2016

Several members of the NovelTM team will be presenting at the upcoming MLA 2016 conference in Austin, Texas. On Saturday, January 9th, from 1:45-3:00 in 5C, ACC, Mark Algee-Hewitt is presenting “Literary Sociality: Networks of Enlightenment on Stage and in Print”. On Sunday, January 10th, from 10:15-11:30, in 5A, ACC, he is part of a…

Detecting Literary Characters

In conjunction with the Network Dynamics Lab at McGill, Andrew Piper and the .txtLAB team are pleased to announce the acceptance of a new paper in this year’s Conference for Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing (EMNLP-15). The paper offers additional methods beyond NER for identifying characters in novels. Below is Andrew’s post from the .txtLAB blog outlining…

How quickly do literary standards change?

by Ted Underwood and Jordan Sellers Part of this project will appear next year — revised and improved — in MLQ. But we’ve decided to release it as a free-standing draft rather than a preprint, because it allows us to use color and to explore some puzzling leads that won’t fit into the physical limits…

Seven ways humanists are using computers to understand text

[This is an updated version of a blog post that NovelTM co-investigator Ted Underwood wrote three years ago, which organized introductory resources for a workshop. Getting ready for another workshop this summer, he glanced back at the old post and realized it’s out of date, because we’ve collectively covered a lot of ground in three…

Ted Underwood in Slate Magazine

NovelTM member Ted Underwood, and future members Hoyt Long and Richard Jean So recently published a compelling response to Thomas Piketty in Slate on money in the history of the novel. Drawing in part from HathiTrust Digital Library,  the authors counted references to amounts of money in 7,700 English-language works of fiction between 1750 and…