How quickly do literary standards change?

by Ted Underwood and Jordan Sellers Part of this project will appear next year — revised and improved — in MLQ. But we’ve decided to release it as a free-standing draft rather than a preprint, because it allows us to use color and to explore some puzzling leads that won’t fit into the physical limits…

Seven ways humanists are using computers to understand text

[This is an updated version of a blog post that NovelTM co-investigator Ted Underwood wrote three years ago, which organized introductory resources for a workshop. Getting ready for another workshop this summer, he glanced back at the old post and realized it’s out of date, because we’ve collectively covered a lot of ground in three…

Development of a (Semi-) Automatic Character Network Tool

This is the third post in the series of .txtLAB intern projects. It is authored by Tristan Dahn. The concept of social network analysis – initially rooted in classical sociology and more recently in the social scientific, mathematic, and computer science realms – dates at least as far back as the mid 1960’s [7]. Classically,…

Call for papers: 3rd Workshop on Big Humanities Data, held in conjunction with IEEE Big Data 2015

The 3rd IEEE Workshop on “Big Humanities Data” will be held on Thursday, October 29, 2015, in conjunction with the 2015 IEEE International Conference on Big Data (IEEE BigData 2015), which takes place between October 29 and November 1 2015 in Santa Clara, California, USA, and which provides a leading international forum for disseminating the latest research in the growing field…

Matt Erlin Delivers Keynote Address at Penn DH Conference

Matt Erlin gave a lecture entitled “Digital Humanities Myths and Legends” at the conference “Mapping, Mining, Redefining: The Digital Turn in the Humanities,” which was held at the University of Pennsylvania on April 23-25, 2015. Myths can be understood not only as forms of collective delusion but also as origin stories, emplotments that we use…